Company Employees – Obitel Kiev http://obitel.kiev.ua/ Tue, 17 May 2022 21:47:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://obitel.kiev.ua/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2-150x150.png Company Employees – Obitel Kiev http://obitel.kiev.ua/ 32 32 Netflix lays off 150 employees amid decline in subscribers: NPR https://obitel.kiev.ua/netflix-lays-off-150-employees-amid-decline-in-subscribers-npr/ Tue, 17 May 2022 21:47:35 +0000 https://obitel.kiev.ua/netflix-lays-off-150-employees-amid-decline-in-subscribers-npr/ Netflix is ​​laying off 150 employees to control costs amid slowing revenue growth revealed in the streaming giant’s first-quarter earnings call. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images Netflix is ​​laying off 150 employees to control costs amid slowing revenue growth revealed in the streaming giant’s first-quarter earnings call. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images […]]]>

Netflix is ​​laying off 150 employees to control costs amid slowing revenue growth revealed in the streaming giant’s first-quarter earnings call.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images


hide caption

toggle caption

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images


Netflix is ​​laying off 150 employees to control costs amid slowing revenue growth revealed in the streaming giant’s first-quarter earnings call.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Streaming giant Netflix is ​​laying off an additional 150 employees starting Tuesday, the company confirmed to NPR. The workforce restructuring is the latest signal of a major shift at the company, as it signaled a drop in subscriber numbers for the first time in a decade.

This month, layoffs of employees and contractors at Netflix fan site Tudum made waves online. The company was criticized for laying off recently recruited staff and failing to internally market their work.

The employees laid off on Tuesday are “mostly based in the United States,” a Netflix spokesperson told NPR in a statement.

“These changes are primarily driven by business needs rather than individual performance, which makes them particularly challenging as none of us want to say goodbye to such great colleagues,” the spokesperson said. .

Netflix is ​​making the changes to contain costs amid slowing revenue growth revealed in its first-quarter earnings call.

These layoffs reflect a cultural shift that Netflix is ​​undergoing. Following controversial programming on its platform, the tech giant recently changed its corporate culture memo to say that employees may have to work on projects they deem harmful.

“We program for a diversity of audiences and tastes; and we let viewers decide what’s right for them, rather than Netflix censoring specific artists or voices,” the updated section reads.

Netflix, once a major entertainment industry disruptor, is struggling to maintain its dominance. Other possible changes that have recently riled the public include an alleged crackdown on password sharing.

]]>
Fast Company Survey Questions on Abortion Access and the Workplace https://obitel.kiev.ua/fast-company-survey-questions-on-abortion-access-and-the-workplace/ Mon, 16 May 2022 09:30:05 +0000 https://obitel.kiev.ua/fast-company-survey-questions-on-abortion-access-and-the-workplace/ We contacted the companies in March, asking them to answer the following questions: Company Name Contact name and email What percentage of your American workforce are women? Does your employee health care policy cover abortion care in states where it is legal? Does your employee healthcare policy cover birth control? If your employee’s health policy […]]]>

We contacted the companies in March, asking them to answer the following questions:

  • Company Name
  • Contact name and email
  • What percentage of your American workforce are women?
  • Does your employee health care policy cover abortion care in states where it is legal?
  • Does your employee healthcare policy cover birth control?
  • If your employee’s health policy does not cover abortion or birth control, please explain why.
  • Have your employees expressed concerns about access to abortion and/or the impending Supreme Court ruling on abortion? If so, can you expand on those concerns and share details of how your business has responded?
  • Has your company made any public statements regarding its position on abortion access, and/or would you like to do so here?
  • If your company has taken a public position on abortion, which of the following have you done? (Please specify if you choose “other”.)
    • Communicate your support for abortion access to all employees
    • Provide comprehensive abortion coverage (i.e. insurance coverage or subsidies) to employees and clearly communicate policies
    • Donate to organizations that support abortion rights and promote abortion access
    • Make financial contributions to politicians who support abortion
    • Other:
  • If the Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade, how does your company plan to respond? For example: do you have plans to ensure your employees can access abortion care or provide insurance coverage for the abortion pill? (Please specify if you choose “other”.)
    • Consider moving the business location to a state with better access to abortion
    • Lobby the Governor/State Legislature to advocate for abortion access
    • Support employees who need access to abortion by (providing financial support for abortion, time off to travel, etc.)
    • Expand insurance coverage to include access to the abortion pill
    • Other:
  • Is there anything else you would like to share?
]]>
New Tripwire owner lays off dozens, 3 months after buying Portland tech company https://obitel.kiev.ua/new-tripwire-owner-lays-off-dozens-3-months-after-buying-portland-tech-company/ Thu, 12 May 2022 17:18:00 +0000 https://obitel.kiev.ua/new-tripwire-owner-lays-off-dozens-3-months-after-buying-portland-tech-company/ Dozens of Tripwire employees lost their jobs Wednesday, three months after the Portland company was sold to a Minnesota firm. It’s unclear exactly how many lost their jobs at the online security company, but the recently laid off Tripwire employees counted at least a few dozen of their colleagues among those who lost their jobs […]]]>

Dozens of Tripwire employees lost their jobs Wednesday, three months after the Portland company was sold to a Minnesota firm.

It’s unclear exactly how many lost their jobs at the online security company, but the recently laid off Tripwire employees counted at least a few dozen of their colleagues among those who lost their jobs in Wednesday’s budget cuts, including a handful senior managers and executives. Some have said that the number of job losses is considerably higher.

HelpSystems, the new owner, acknowledged the layoffs but did not say how many people had lost their jobs or how many remained from the Tripwire acquisition. He said he has no plans to close Tripwire’s former headquarters in Portland, but added that most employees prefer to work remotely.

“We remain impressed with the strength of the company’s core offerings,” HelpSystems said in a statement. “We are confident that we have the right organization in place at Tripwire to rebuild the organization for growth.”

Founded in 1997, Tripwire was among Portland’s most promising tech companies in the years after the dot-com collapse.

However, growth slowed during the Great Recession and Tripwire abandoned plans for an IPO. Instead, Tripwire sold to a private equity firm in 2011, which then sold the Portland company three years later to a St. Louis company called Belden Inc.

HelpSystems paid $350 million for Tripwire in February, about half of what the company sold in 2014. Tripwire earned $107 million in revenue in 2021, according to Belden.

The Portland company had 450 employees when it was sold in 2014, including 250 in Oregon. It’s unclear how many Tripwire employed prior to this week’s layoffs.

In a memo to employees Wednesday, new owner HelpSystems said it had completed a 75-day review of Tripwire’s operation and decided to make several changes.

“We now understand where our teams need to be adjusted. After considering all possible options, we have concluded that certain roles in the United States and Canada will be affected and in other countries layoffs may exist,” the company wrote on Wednesday. “We will be reaching out to everyone at Tripwire today to schedule calls and share more details.”

The newly laid off employees described their severance package as reasonable, but not generous, and said they were heartbroken to lose their connection to their colleagues and their work.

Amid the tightest job market in generations, however, some said they had already been contacted by potential employers. On LinkedIn, employees and managers of other companies offered job offers directly to some of those who had announced their layoffs.

Tripwire History

1997: Gene Kim and Wyatt Starnes found Visual Computing Corp. ; early products include network security software called Tripwire and a video game called Piggyland; Kim developed Tripwire while a student at Purdue University

1998: Company renamed Tripwire, launches first product, raises $2.4 million in first outside funding (video game company split into separate company)

2000: Tripwire raises $9 million in venture capital

2001: Tripwire raises an additional $24 million in venture capital (total $37.4 million)

2002: Investors invest another $9.3 million in Tripwire

2004: Fight against cancer, Starnes steps down as CEO; Jim Johnson, retired Intel executive, named interim CEO

2006: Johnson drops the “acting” label

2009: Johnson says he plans a 2010 IPO to repay early Tripwire investors

2010: Tripwire files for IPO

2011: Tripwire sold to Thoma Bravo

2014: Tripwire sells to Belden for $710 million.

2022: Belden sells Tripwire to HelpSystems for $350 million

–Mike Rogoway | mrogoway@oregonian.com | 503-294-7699| Twitter: @rogoway |

]]>
What to do with employees who disengage on Zoom https://obitel.kiev.ua/what-to-do-with-employees-who-disengage-on-zoom/ Tue, 10 May 2022 08:32:42 +0000 https://obitel.kiev.ua/what-to-do-with-employees-who-disengage-on-zoom/ Digitally-enabled corporate meetings (think Zoom, Microsoft Teams, and Google Meet) have exploded in recent years, primarily due to COVID-19 restrictions that have forced millions of career professionals to work remotely. residence. Zoom alone saves, on average3.3 trillion meetings per year, with 300 million daily meeting participants. Still, not everyone is OK with showing their face […]]]>

Digitally-enabled corporate meetings (think Zoom, Microsoft Teams, and Google Meet) have exploded in recent years, primarily due to COVID-19 restrictions that have forced millions of career professionals to work remotely. residence.

Zoom alone saves, on average3.3 trillion meetings per year, with 300 million daily meeting participants.

Still, not everyone is OK with showing their face in workplace video meetings — and some managers don’t like staff members hitting the “video off” button.

According to a study of 200 US executives by Vyopta, a collaborative intelligence company, 92% said that employees who often mute themselves or their cameras during video calls “probably don’t have a problem.” ‘long-term future’ with their business.

According to the study, managers who host video calls say turning off the camera shows employees a lack of engagement as well as a “sign of poor performance to come.” Forty-three percent of executives think staff members who cut video during meetings “scan websites or social media,” and another 40 percent think these employees “text or chat.”

Temperamental employees may take a different approach. Some may be camera shy, may feel awkward or distracted showing their face on video, or may feel like they are getting the most out of a video meeting by listening and taking grades.

What should a manager do in the event of a video no-show? There is no definitive answer, say management experts.

“While the workforce is built in favor of extroverts, nearly half of workers are introverts, which means many are likely to feel camera shy,” said expert Ashley Stahl. career at SoFi, a personal finance company in New York. “Also, a lot of us have been pretty isolated over the past couple of years…communicating primarily via email.”

Stahl thinks video conferencing is inherently unnatural, and each worker likely has different comfort levels with it. But persistent video blockers can erect barriers to career advancement.

While camera shyness is understandable, she says, “it’s no excuse to block your [career] the evolution towards today’s video age.”

Get staff members to face up

Managers who want to see the faces of team members in virtual meetings need to be creative and persuasive. Follow the steps below to get workers to switch from “camera off” to “camera on”.

Show carrot and stick. Managers should encourage their employees to turn on their camera. If the employee resists, take the time to explore their concerns.

“Listen with the intent to understand their perspective and see if you can meet in the middle,” said Courtney Altamirano, senior director of human resources at the University of Phoenix in Mesa, Arizona. “Often there’s a reasonable compromise that everyone can live with, like using different filters and backgrounds or offering camera-free Fridays.”

Compromise can also take different forms. At ApprovedCourse, a professional education company in Fort Worth, Texas, company founder Jorden Fabel will provide compensation to staff members who choose to turn off the camera, as well as certain warrants.

“Our protocol is that employees don’t have to show their faces on Zoom calls if they don’t want to,” Fabel said. “However, there is the caveat that you should have your camera when you say hello, goodbye and whenever you talk.”

Recognize the workers who flip the switch. Managers should always help employees understand the value of being “face to face” virtually. “When they turn on their cameras, celebrate their choice,” Altamirano said. “Send them a note thanking them for getting on board with the change. Let them know that you understand this was difficult for them and that you truly appreciate them turning on their cameras.”

Take a phased approach. Stahl said she hated video conferencing, but over time she learned to live with the camera experience. Now she uses that experience as a manager to make staff members more comfortable with video dating.

“I learned that the more you do it, the easier it gets,” she said. “One key is exploring by clicking ‘hide self-view’ on Zoom, which keeps your camera on, but hides your own screen.” Stahl said she started doing it recently and hiding her image made her a better listener.

“One of the main reasons a lot of people feel uncomfortable while video conferencing is because they can’t stop looking at themselves,” she said. “In fact, 30% of us spend more than half of our video call time looking at our own face. »

Make the case of “camera on”. Managers can win over camera-shy staff members by persuading them that it’s the right thing to do, for themselves and for the team.

“Let team members know that having your camera on helps the whole team interact with each other and make eye contact so people can see each other,” said Lauren Stempel, Vice President of Recruitment at Betts, a Los Angeles-based recruiting firm. “Let them know it helps with social cues and employers can often tell when someone is engaged, confused, or ready to ask questions.”

Managers should also lead by example and always have their camera on. “Use your facial expressions and enthusiasm on camera to motivate people as well,” Stempel said. “If a manager is happy to be in front of the camera, it will positively influence the attitude of his employees towards the camera as well.”

If an employee refuses to turn on the camera, Altamirano advises managers to remind team members of the impact “going dark” during meetings can have on their career brand.

“Remember, when we were all in person, if you didn’t show up for a meeting, you might miss out on career opportunities. [or] chances of exposure or networking, Altamirano said. “Whether it’s fair or not is irrelevant. If people can’t see your face, your intentions, your commitment, you’re less likely to be top of mind for that next special project or promotion.”

Set terms and be candid with reluctant staff members. If you’re a manager who strongly believes that employees should be videotaped for virtual meetings, be direct and set some conditions.

“If you work with people, especially in public areas like recruiting, sales or customer service, having your camera on is essential as it builds engagement and helps attendees put a face to the name,” Stempel said. “If they don’t want to meet expectations, swing the conversation [by] reminding them why it’s an expectation, what they’ll get out of it, and that you need them to live up to it.”

Also, be crystal clear about the need to film if the company makes it mandatory. “If you can do your job in person, you can do it on camera,” she said. “If an employee does not consistently use their camera without providing justification, warnings should be given in accordance with company policy.”

Brian O’Connell is a freelance writer based in Bucks County, Pennsylvania. A former Wall Street trader, he is the author of the books CNBC Build Wealth (John Wiley & Son, 2001) and The Career Survival Guide (McGraw-Hill, 2004).

]]>
the office is “anachronistic” and “from a pre-digital era” https://obitel.kiev.ua/the-office-is-anachronistic-and-from-a-pre-digital-era/ Sun, 08 May 2022 16:13:22 +0000 https://obitel.kiev.ua/the-office-is-anachronistic-and-from-a-pre-digital-era/ Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky recently announced that the company will let employees work remotely forever without losing pay. In an interview for Time’s The Leadership Brief, he said “the office as we know it is over.” He also explained why he thinks the three-day office hybrid model is flawed. Loading Something is loading. For Airbnb […]]]>
  • Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky recently announced that the company will let employees work remotely forever without losing pay.
  • In an interview for Time’s The Leadership Brief, he said “the office as we know it is over.”
  • He also explained why he thinks the three-day office hybrid model is flawed.

For Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky, working in the office is now a thing of the past.

In an interview for Time’s The Leadership Brief published on Sunday, Chesky said he thought the office was “an anachronistic form” that “came out of a pre-digital era.” His comments come after Airbnb announced earlier this week that it would let employees work remotely forever without a pay cut, citing the possibility of expanding its talent pool and noting that the company had experienced its downtime. two most productive years in its history working remotely.

“I think the office as we know it is over,” he told Time. “We can’t try to keep 2019 more than 1950. We have to move on.”

He continued, “If the office didn’t exist, I like to ask, would we invent it? And if we invented it, what would it be used for? still going to go to cafes and work – those spaces just make sense. But I think for someone whose work is on a laptop, the question is, well, what’s the use of a desk?”

Shortly after announcing that Airbnb will go entirely remote, Chesky said the company’s careers page received more than 800,000 views.

In January, Chesky said he “lives on Airbnb,” working in different cities across the United States. In his TIME interview on Sunday, he acknowledged there will still be a need for offices, but concluded that “the office has to do something that a home cannot do.”

“People will still go to offices, but it will be for different purposes, for collaborative spaces,” he said.

Chesky told Time that working 100% remotely can diversify hiring since employees can be based anywhere, but it can also make some employees feel isolated from their colleagues and the company.

Although he said a compromise was needed, he believes there are flaws in the common hybrid working model of having office workers work three days a week, which companies like Google and Apple use.

Airbnb’s alternative to this model is for employees to meet face-to-face approximately one week per quarter.

“My prediction is that three days a week becomes two days a week, and two days a week becomes one day a week, and pretty soon are you really in a hybrid world, or are you mostly a remote world?” he said. “People don’t realize that this two, three day a week thing isn’t super sustainable. People are going to realize, ‘OK, let’s be more intentional about when people come together. And let’s come together during a week or two at a time.’ “

]]>
NLRB finds merit in union charges against Amazon and Starbucks https://obitel.kiev.ua/nlrb-finds-merit-in-union-charges-against-amazon-and-starbucks/ Fri, 06 May 2022 23:44:16 +0000 https://obitel.kiev.ua/nlrb-finds-merit-in-union-charges-against-amazon-and-starbucks/ In a sign that federal labor officials are closely monitoring management behavior during labor campaigns, the National Labor Relations Board said Friday it found merit in accusations that Amazon and Starbucks violated labor laws. . At Amazon, the labor board has found merit in accusations that the company demanded workers attend union-busting meetings at a […]]]>

In a sign that federal labor officials are closely monitoring management behavior during labor campaigns, the National Labor Relations Board said Friday it found merit in accusations that Amazon and Starbucks violated labor laws. .

At Amazon, the labor board has found merit in accusations that the company demanded workers attend union-busting meetings at a sprawling Staten Island warehouse where the Amazon Labor Union won a stunning election victory last month. latest. The decision was communicated to the union on Friday by an attorney with the regional labor board office in Brooklyn, according to Seth Goldstein, an attorney representing the union.

Such meetings, often known as “captive audience” meetings, are legal under current labor board precedent. But last month, the council’s general counsel, Jennifer Abruzzo, issued a memo saying the precedent contradicted underlying federal law, and she said she would seek to challenge it.

In the same filing, the Amazon Labor Union accused the company of threatening to withhold employee benefits if they voted to unionize, and of misrepresenting employees that they could be fired if the warehouse were to unionize and they didn’t pay the union. rights. The labor board also found merit in those charges, according to an email from regional office attorney Matt Jackson.

Mr. Jackson said the agency would soon file a lawsuit reflecting those charges unless Amazon settles the matter. The complaint would be brought before an administrative law judge, whose decision could be appealed to the Washington Labor Board.

Mr. Goldstein commended Ms. Abruzzo and the regional office for taking “decisive action to end meetings with a captive audience” and said the right to unionize “will be protected by ending the inherently coercive labor practices of Amazon”.

Kelly Nantel, a spokeswoman for Amazon, said in a statement that “these allegations are false and we look forward to showing it throughout the process.”

At Starbucks, where the union won the first votes at more than 50 stores since December, the labor board on Friday filed a lawsuit over a series of charges the union filed, most in February, accusing the company of misbehaviour illegal. These charges include firing employees in retaliation for supporting the union; threaten employees’ ability to receive new benefits if they choose to unionize; requiring workers to be available for a minimum number of hours to remain employed in a unionized store without negotiating change, as a way to expel at least one union supporter; and by effectively promising benefits to workers if they decide not to join a union.

In addition to these allegations, the labor board found to be true accusations that the company intimidated workers by closing Buffalo-area stores and monitoring workers while they were on the job. All of these actions would be illegal.

In a statement, Starbucks Workers United, the branch of the union that represents workers there, said the finding “confirms the extent and depravity of Starbucks’ conduct in Western New York for much of the year”. He added: “Starbucks will be held accountable for the anti-union minefield it has forced workers through to fight for their right to organize.”

Starbucks said in a statement that the complaint does not constitute a labor board judgment, adding, “We believe the allegations in the complaint are false and we look forward to presenting our evidence when the allegations are adjudicated.”

]]>
How to win back employees who quit during the pandemic https://obitel.kiev.ua/how-to-win-back-employees-who-quit-during-the-pandemic/ Thu, 05 May 2022 04:30:00 +0000 https://obitel.kiev.ua/how-to-win-back-employees-who-quit-during-the-pandemic/ Fashion companies struggling to fill positions amid the current labor shortage are turning to a new pool of candidates: dozens of people leaving their pandemic-era jobs who want to recover their old jobs. Whether they miss their former co-workers and clients, face financial hardship, or now realize the grass really wasn’t any greener, some of […]]]>

Fashion companies struggling to fill positions amid the current labor shortage are turning to a new pool of candidates: dozens of people leaving their pandemic-era jobs who want to recover their old jobs.

Whether they miss their former co-workers and clients, face financial hardship, or now realize the grass really wasn’t any greener, some of the millions of workers who left their jobs as of 2020 as part of the so-called great resignation are knocking at their door. doors of former employers.

Nearly 1 in 5 people who quit their job during the pandemic have already ‘boomerang’ back to the job they left and, of those who have not yet returned to their old job, 41% would consider it if that was an option, an April 2022 survey of HR provider UKG found.

It’s always been common for executives and designers to leave their jobs only to return after a few years, usually with new skills, higher pay, and a better title. Luxury fashion veteran Jacopo Venturini returned to Valentino for the third time in June 2020, this time as the brand’s Managing Director. He enriched his curriculum vitae with roles at Prada and Gucci between two stints at the Italian luxury brand.

“When I left Valentino for the second time, I thought it was the right time for me to expand and perfect my skills and competencies, acquired over the years, in different contexts and environments”, said Venturini told BoF in an email. “I was ready to grow and there was no space to do it internally.”

But the latest influx of repeat hires covers every rung of the career ladder and is driven as much by retailers desperate to fill vacancies as by the career plans of individual employees.

Boomerang employees also enjoy unique benefits.

Rehiring a former employee can save a company thousands of dollars – they usually don’t need as much training as a new employee and are already familiar with the way of working and company goals, according to experts. The return of a former colleague can serve as a powerful signal to an existing workforce that a company is a desirable place to work.

Former employees will not automatically return. Labor has the upper hand in many areas of work right now: US employers posted a record 11.5 million job openings in March, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Companies should maintain contact with former employees and actively attract them. Not to mention, they need a company culture that rewards loyalty and doesn’t punish those who seek work elsewhere.

“This boomerang thing is a really good example of where we’re at…companies are progressive in their thinking about hiring right now because they really don’t have a choice,” said Chris Mullen , Executive Director of UKG’s Workforce Institute. “They have to act fast.”

Building an “alumni network”

Companies that keep meticulous records of departing workers, including contact information, performance reviews, and feedback from exit interviews, have a head start in attracting boomerang employees.

At Workjam, a software application for retail workers, chief executive Stephen Kramer said the company is working with its customers – which include retailers Ulta and TJMaxx – to help them build “alumni networks so that former employees feel more like proud graduates of their former workplaces rather than disgruntled exes who never want to come back.

“The reality is that it’s very difficult, in the short term, if you haven’t had that relationship with former employees to try to reach out now,” he said.

Most employees returning to their old jobs had a “strong and supportive manager”, according to the UKG study. Rokt, an e-commerce technology company that handles online transactions for companies like Wayfair and Lands’ End, has rehired six former employees in the past year and a half, including a senior software engineer and a senior vice president. of the product. Human resources director Sarah Wilson said she relied primarily on employee relationships built and nurtured by managers to pile on the company’s roster.

“Forget the HR and the recruitment function, the people manager or the senior leader staying in contact with [their] people after they’re gone, and really caring about them as humans is, I think, the easiest strategy to employ to bring people back to the boomerang,” she said.

When Venturini returned to Valentino in June 2020, for example, the company said the move was spurred by “a strong passion for the brand and a long-standing relationship” with creative director Pierpaolo Piccioli.

“Knowing the roots of where you worked and coming back after years means that the connection originally created is a strong and special bond that allows you to perform at your best with a broader vision and revised outlook,” Venturini said.

Who to bring back

Companies should use human resources software that allows managers to flag “regrettable and non-regrettable” employee departures, Wilson said. Employees who have been terminated for infractions or poor performance are obvious red flags for rehiring, but not all top performers should be rehired, experts say.

Exit interviews should not be treated as a trivial formality. Instead, employers should pay close attention to employee feedback – at all levels – to determine if there is an opportunity to re-engage in the future. For example, if a good employee was leaving due to scheduling issues or insufficient pay, companies should only reach out if they’ve met those challenges, Mullen said.

For retailers, many of the factors that have caused store workers and some company employees to quit over the past two years – such as Covid safety concerns, low wages and a lack of flexibility in the employment – ​​have in some cases been resolved, said Rob Klitsch, director of UKG’s retail, hospitality and catering practice group.

Before rehiring a former employee, Kramer said Workjam considers factors such as how long an employee has been with the company, even if they left in good standing.

“I heard…we should only target people who have worked with us for more than six months,” he said. “Anything less than that, they probably aren’t interested or maybe they don’t know enough about our organization.

Wilson said reaching out to former employees was worth the extra effort, though.

“I would welcome the boomerang employee with open arms – the idea of ​​someone going outside and then deciding to come back is very powerful,” she said. “They know the good, the bad, and the ugly, and then make the choice to come back – that’s a very powerful story and a very strong reinforcement of your culture for your existing employees.”

]]>
Putin’s war prompts Russian tech workers to flee the country in historic numbers https://obitel.kiev.ua/putins-war-prompts-russian-tech-workers-to-flee-the-country-in-historic-numbers/ Sun, 01 May 2022 12:34:53 +0000 https://obitel.kiev.ua/putins-war-prompts-russian-tech-workers-to-flee-the-country-in-historic-numbers/ Placeholder while loading article actions RIGA, Latvia — In his two-bedroom apartment in Moscow, 35-year-old designer Pavel Telitchenko has spent years pondering leaving Russia, fearing the gradual rise of a police state. Then, three days after the Kremlin tanks arrived in Ukraine, he made the difficult choice – to pack up his young family, along […]]]>
Placeholder while loading article actions

RIGA, Latvia — In his two-bedroom apartment in Moscow, 35-year-old designer Pavel Telitchenko has spent years pondering leaving Russia, fearing the gradual rise of a police state. Then, three days after the Kremlin tanks arrived in Ukraine, he made the difficult choice – to pack up his young family, along with his precious collection of vinyl records, and join in a historic exodus that includes a mass exodus of the best and Russia’s brightest minds in technology.

“I didn’t want to make an emotional decision, but I couldn’t raise my son in a country like this,” said Telichenko, who moved back to neighboring Latvia in March with his wife and 3-year-old son. . He spoke in their comfortable two-story Riga walk-up, standing by a high shelf with a white statue of Santa Claus from his childhood – a reminder of what he had left behind.

“The war made me realize that Russia will not change,” he said.

Western attention is focused on the millions of refugees who have fled Ukraine since the Russian assault began on February 24. But Russia is also in the midst of a wave of emigration that is disrupting its artistic and journalistic spheres, and in particular the world of technology. .

The Russian Electronic Communications Association told Russia’s lower house of parliament last month that 50,000 to 70,000 tech workers had fled the country, with another 100,000 expected to leave within the next month, for a total approximately 10% of the sector’s workforce. Ok Russians, a new non-profit group helping emigrants, used a sample of data from neighboring countries and social media surveys to estimate that almost 300,000 Russians in total had left since the start of the war .

Mitya Aleshkovskiy, co-founder of Ok Russians, said some of those leaving are opposition activists, artists and journalists – people President Vladimir Putin is likely happy to see go and whose departure could reduce active dissent in Russia. But nearly half of those leaving are from a tech background — a highly transient and globally sought-after workforce, many of whom fear Russia’s global isolation, newly unfavorable business climate and almost total authoritarianism.

The Russian government is “really scared and shocked,” Aleshkovskiy said. “The Russian Prime Minister begged these guys to stay. He tells them, “Don’t worry about Apple leaving, we’re going to build our own Apple Store.” Please don’t go. … But I would say the best people are leaving right now. … The highly skilled, highly educated and highly paid specialists.

Thousands of Russians who left, initially fearing Putin would seal Russia’s borders, have left in recent weeks. But at least some are expected to leave, as experts predict another wave of departures in the weeks and months to come. Global migration and Russian population experts call the current exodus from Russia the fastest since the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917, when millions of intellectuals and economic elites fled the rise of the Soviet Union.

“In some ways this is a first,” said Jeanne Batalova, global migration expert at the Migration Policy Institute. “We are talking about a lot of people in a very condensed period, a matter of weeks. In 1917, Russia was in the midst of civil war. But this is happening at a time when there is no war in Russia itself.

The departure of so much talent threatens to undermine a host of Russian sectors, from state media to the aerospace and aviation industries already reeling from Western sanctions. The tech and start-up ecosystem was already withering under escalating government interference and censorship.

Desperate to stem the tide, the Russian government has passed an unprecedented package of incentives offering IT companies tax breaks and reduced regulation. Computer scientists, meanwhile, are promised subsidized housing, pay raises and no income tax for the next three years. Notably, the decree signed by Putin also grants IT workers an exemption from conscription for military service, which many young Russians have sought to avoid by fleeing the country.

Mikhail Mizhinsky, who runs Relocode, a London-based company that helps tech companies relocate, said its Russian customers have grown to more than 200 since the war, a 20-fold increase. The biggest are looking to relocate 1,000 employees. Most are relocating 100 to 200 staff.

“We’ve never seen anything like it,” he said.

Cracks are emerging in the Russian elite as tycoons begin to lament the invasion

The tech exodus is also due to Western sanctions and the downsizing or ending of operations by Western companies such as IBM, Intel and Microsoft. Smaller Russian tech companies or companies run by international Russians are also leaving. Meanwhile, major Russian tech players like Yandex, often referred to as “the Russian Google”, have rushed to retain employees fleeing Russia.

A person close to Yandex who spoke on condition of anonymity to disclose internal discussions said the company was considering setting up new or expanded offices in Armenia, Georgia and Turkey, where “many” of its engineers have recently moved.

The company has also been trying to find ways to overcome logistical challenges, including paying relocated staff, as Western sanctions have largely cut off Russian bank cards from the international financial system. In March, Yandex issued a one-time cash bonus for employee retention and began offering its staff psychological counseling.

“The question is, as a company, should we set up local offices to support engineers who have left Russia, because brain drain is seen as a big problem? ” the person said. “Russian engineers are pretty cool, and it’s not a big deal for them to get into Facebook or Google, so we have to compete with those tech companies.”

Interviews with logistics companies and tech workers themselves suggest they are overrepresented in the exodus as they rank among the few workers in Russia who can easily leave. International remote work, especially in the pandemic era, was already common in the industry, while foreign demand for their skills makes them good candidates for work visas outside of Russia.

Many of them are also younger, recent college graduates who would be at risk if they stayed.

“I thought I might be sent to war in Ukraine,” said Maxim Nemkevich, a product manager at a major Russian IT company who fled to Turkey in March after being invited by his university, where he was a consultant. , to fill out a form with the “skills” it could offer the military.

“And then I thought, [Putin] would start stopping IT people from leaving Russia, because so many of us are leaving and they need us. That convinced me it was time to go.

Russian tech workers, he said, are now “everywhere” in Istanbul. Temporary office spaces, restaurants and sidewalks are “full of Russian speaking people. There are so many Russians here. He said he plans to stay in Turkey as long as possible and apply for graduate programs elsewhere in Europe.

“I fear that Russia will become like North Korea. The national course will be self-isolation, and it will close any connection with the Western world and be closely tied to China,” Nemkevich said. “I don’t want to live in that kind of country.”

Russia lacked qualified IT personnel even before its invasion of Ukraine. Last year, Russia’s Ministry of Digital Development estimated the shortage of tech workers in the country at between 500,000 and one million, with a shortfall of 2 million expected by 2027.

And many departing Russians – like Telichenko – had considered emigration long before the invasion. After launching a Moscow-based platform in 2019 for large online conferences, he legally established a new company in Latvia in 2021 and obtained a resident visa. His longer-term plan was to shuttle between Moscow and Riga, but he had no immediate plans to move.

Then came the war. He was alarmed by what he described as a herd mentality of people no doubt accepting the invasion. Others, he said, were too afraid to voice their disagreement. He remembers meeting with an employee in a coworking space he was renting in Moscow.

“I could see in his eyes that something was wrong,” he said. When he asked her how she was, she burst into tears, confiding her fears of the invasion.

With the ban on flights between Russia and the European Union, getting to Riga meant first flying to St. Petersburg and then riding a 14-hour bus ride. Then, like so many Russian emigrants, renting an apartment was a hardship, in part because Western sanctions made it difficult for him to withdraw money or open a bank account.

His mother at home feared that everyone in Latvia – a former Soviet republic that is now a member of the European Union and NATO, and whose government is fiercely anti-Putin – “hates Russians”. But instead, Telichenko said, he and his family found a warm welcome among a people who lived under Soviet-era Moscow.

“Latvians understand,” he said.

Mary Ilyushina contributed to this report.

]]>
The 10 Best Fully Remote Companies to Work For in 2022 https://obitel.kiev.ua/the-10-best-fully-remote-companies-to-work-for-in-2022/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 13:29:39 +0000 https://obitel.kiev.ua/the-10-best-fully-remote-companies-to-work-for-in-2022/ Even as some companies return to the office this spring, a growing number of organizations are offering remote opportunities — or opting to forgo the office altogether and let all of their employees work from home permanently. To help remote job seekers find the best opportunities, MakeMyMove.com, an online directory of cities that will pay […]]]>

Even as some companies return to the office this spring, a growing number of organizations are offering remote opportunities — or opting to forgo the office altogether and let all of their employees work from home permanently.

To help remote job seekers find the best opportunities, MakeMyMove.com, an online directory of cities that will pay remote workers to move there, has identified the 23 best places to work entirely remotely.

MakeMyMove.com consulted ratings from Glassdoor, Blind, LinkedIn and other platforms to compile the list, taking into account the geographic diversity of each company’s employees as well as its remote working policies. The companies on this list are all 100% remote with no corporate campuses.

“I absolutely think we’re going to see more workers moving from in-person and hybrid jobs to remote jobs in the coming months,” Evan Hock, co-founder and president of MakeMyMove.com, told CNBC Make It. . “Many people have been exposed to new freedom and flexibility with remote work during the pandemic, and they are not ready to give it up.”

The most attractive benefit that attracts job seekers to remote work over in-person or hybrid work is the freedom to live where they want, instead of needing to be within commuting distance of their employer, says Hock. “There are also the opportunities to save money that come with it, and more free time to spend with friends and family,” he adds.

Here are the 10 best remote companies to work for, according to MakeMyMove.com (see the full list here):

1. Hub Staff

Industry: Technology

Notable advantages: Annual company pension, 25 days of paid vacation each year, allowance for work equipment/technology

Recent job offers: Content Manager, DevOps Engineer, Mobile Developer

2. Quickly

Industry: Technology

Notable Benefits: Stock options, unlimited paid holidays, telecommuting and Internet reimbursement

Recent job offers: Account Manager, Senior Product Designer, Software Engineer

3. Doist

Industry: Technology

Notable Benefits: Annual corporate retreat, professional development allowance, health and wellness budget, cost of coworking space covered

Recent job offers: Writer, Product manager, Full-stack developer

4. Ghost

Industry: Technology, publishing

Notable advantages: Team retreats, last Friday of each month, new budget for laptop and workspace setup, meeting-free focus time

Recent job offers: Product Engineer, Infrastructure Engineer

5. Frontastic

Industry: Technology

Notable advantages: Three company retreats per year, installation allowance, professional development budget

Recent job offers: Sales Account Manager, Product Manager, Solutions Engineer

6.Topal

Industry: Recruitment

Notable Benefits: Flexible paid time off policies, community events, annual Calm app subscription

Recent job offers: Data analyst, content writer, contract specialist

7. Automatic

Industry: Technology

Notable advantages: Sabbaticals, career coaching, home office setup and coworking allowances

Recent job offers: Brand/Creative Designer, Happiness Engineer, Content Writer

8. Flexible jobs

Industry: Recruitment, hiring

Notable advantages: Professional development allowances, reimbursements for meditation and fitness expenses, housekeeping and technology allowances

Recent job offers: Account Manager, Sales Development Specialist

9. Zapier

Industry: Technology

Notable advantages: Two annual company retreats, home office allowance, unlimited vacation days

Recent job offers: Senior Financial Analyst, Content Specialist, Product Designer

10. Buffer

]]>
Suresh Sambandam Once Sold His Innova to Pay Salary, Now His Software Company Offers BMWs to 5 Employees | Economic news https://obitel.kiev.ua/suresh-sambandam-once-sold-his-innova-to-pay-salary-now-his-software-company-offers-bmws-to-5-employees-economic-news/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 04:23:06 +0000 https://obitel.kiev.ua/suresh-sambandam-once-sold-his-innova-to-pay-salary-now-his-software-company-offers-bmws-to-5-employees-economic-news/ Years ago, Suresh Sambandam from Cuddalore in the coastal belt of Tamil Nadu sold his Innova car for just Rs 6 lakh to pay his employees’ salary. Sambandam, which now owns the multimillion-dollar Kissflow software group, offered a BMW model 530D car costing around Rs 1 crore to five employees. Suresh believes that rewards should […]]]>

Years ago, Suresh Sambandam from Cuddalore in the coastal belt of Tamil Nadu sold his Innova car for just Rs 6 lakh to pay his employees’ salary.

Sambandam, which now owns the multimillion-dollar Kissflow software group, offered a BMW model 530D car costing around Rs 1 crore to five employees. Suresh believes that rewards should be offered to employees to retain and attract exceptional talent.

Another Chennai-based company, IDEAS2IT Technologies, donated 100 Maruti cars to its employees at a total cost of Rs 16 crore. According to IDEAS2IT Founder and Chairman Murali Vivekanandan and his wife and CEO Gayathri, the company is happy to give back to the employees, who have shaped such fortune for the company, what is rightfully theirs.

Born in a village of Cudallore, Sambandam did not even know during his student years that you had to pass entrance exams to be admitted into an engineering program. One of the colleges asked him for Rs 5 lakh as capitation fee.

He gave up his ambition to become an engineer when his father told him he would give him money for admission, but then their family would be in dire straits.

Suresh Sambandam, CEO of Kissflow Software Group, with employees.


Later, Suresh joined a typing institute. During the period, the first set of computers arrived at the institute. It was the first such example in Cudallore itself. Giving an additional Rs 50 on top of his Rs 30 fee, he enrolled for a computer course there. The development of interest in computers was a turning point in his life. Soon he created his own computer institute.

From there, he landed at HP Computers. Its growth is then phenomenal. Today, the Kissflow group is present in 160 countries and has more than 100,000 customers.

Sambandam and Hari Subramaniam, Senior Marketing Director of IDEAS2IT, talk to Manorama about the trends shaping the IT industry and the employee retention challenges IT companies face.

Suresh Sambandam, Founder and CEO of Kissflow Inc:

Once you have sold your Innova car to give a salary to your employees. And now you are giving away 5 BMWs to your loyal employees. Tell us about your journey so far?

Being a first generation entrepreneur, I had virtually no financial backing except for my ex-boss and mentor who supported me financially. In the early 2000s, I left a well-paying job to start a business with no savings to support my family in an emergency. There were times when my credit card paid employee salaries. And there was a time when I had to sell my car. And all of this had to be kept secret, otherwise it would affect employee morale. In the entrepreneurial world, the face of the founder is the barometer that employees look at to gain confidence. So no matter what problems you face, you have to manage and grow the business through the tough times. Belief in our mission on “The Democratization of Application Development, which is now commonly referred to as ‘Citizen Development’, is what kept me and my team going.

Suresh Sambandam celebrates with his employees.


What was the motive for giving BMWs to your employees? How did you come to this decision?

These are the five people who stayed with me in the trenches, through the ups and downs. Without them, Kissflow would not be what it is today. This is a small token of appreciation. I am happy to see them enjoying it with their families.

The recipients of the gifts were: Dinesh Varadharajan, Chief Product Officer; Kausikram Krishnasayee, Director; Vivek Madurai, Director; Adhi Ramanathan, director; and Prasanna Rajendran, Vice President.

Why did you choose the BMW car as a gift?

We did not give any BMW. We gave the 5 Series and that too the 530d M Sport edition, which is one of the top models that offers the best self-driving experience of any BMW. This places all of these people in a new social hierarchy. Not many people in Chennai have this version of BMW – most of the successful founders and managing directors own it. The recipients are on par with the founders of Kissflow and so we wanted them to be treated the same by the company, their friends and family. This is why we have chosen to give this model.

Tell us about the most intimate response you received from employees after the giveaway.

This news is now a national sensation. One of our employees (whom I don’t want to name) sent me this message: My mother was looking for a wife for me and until last week she was uncomfortable using the word Kissflow or saying to the families of future brides where I worked. Today, she proudly quotes “BMW Company” to the family of every bride-to-be she speaks to.

Do you think car donation is becoming a trend among IT companies. Many associate this with the amazing growth of the IT sector after covid. What is your opinion on this?

It’s not about cars at all. As a culture, we reward loyalty. This is a social statement to prove that there are BIG, if not huge, rewards for loyalty. When we talk about loyalty, we are not just talking about permanence here, it is permanence combined with contribution that is rewarded.

I’ve always been concerned about post-COVID attrition rates, especially “The Great Resignation.” Although it was not intended to solve this problem, I am happy that we were able to influence the mindset of many people towards choosing a long-term career instead of short pay rises. Initiatives like ours could potentially be pioneers. We have already seen another company do something similar to what we did.

Suresh Sambandam once sold his Innova to pay a salary, now his software company is offering BMWs to 5 employees

Employees with their families.


Do you provide similar gifts to other employees in future years?

We have always appreciated people who perform exceptionally well and those who have remained loyal to the company – this will continue. It’s part of Kissflow’s DNA. Just last month we held a mega celebration – the Kissflow Altius Awards – where we recognized the best artists of the past year.

IDEAS2IT Technologies, Chief Marketing Officer, Hari Subramanian:

What prompted your company to give cars to your employees?

We have been an employee-centric company since our first day in 2009. We provide an environment of trust, empowerment, opportunity, and many initiatives that meet employee needs. Our employees have returned the favor and helped the company achieve high levels of growth. Given this streak of sustained growth made possible by employees, we have implemented a wealth sharing initiative. Initially, Ideas2IT allocated 100 cars to 100 employees. That’s just the beginning. We plan to roll out more such initiatives in the future.

Why did you choose a car as a gift and how did you select the 100 employees?

It was also a decision of our employees! We shared our plans for launching a wealth sharing initiative and budgets. They researched various options and held several internal discussions. Then they came back to management with the idea of ​​assigning cars. In this first step, we wanted to reward people who have been in the business for 5-12 years (12 is the age of the business itself).

Suresh Sambandam once sold his Innova to pay a salary, now his software company is offering BMWs to 5 employees

Founder and President of IDEAS2IT Murali Vivekanandan with employees and their families.


What was the total cost of this automotive gift program?

Rs 15 Crore.

What advice would you give to other companies for rewarding loyal and hardworking employees?

I wouldn’t call that advice. I will just state the current scenario of the computer industry. The software industry is currently experiencing its greatest demand for talent. IT companies are all in the battle to attract and retain top talent. Companies are now responding with a wage war and continuing to fight. But companies that have taken care of their employees from the start are the ones that win this battle.

A good example is Ideas2IT: we have no problem attracting and retaining talent. Over the past 12 years, we have grown from 6 to 600 people. Over the past 4 years, Ideas2IT has seen 53% YoY revenue growth and a 37% YoY increase in employee strength. Our attrition rate is only 2.7%. Just to illustrate its growth, in 2020 the company was operating on 2 floors in a shared commercial building. On April 11, 2022, we inaugurated our brand new high-end office in Olympia Square, Chennai, where Ideas2IT will occupy all 9 floors.

]]>